READERS’ LETTERS: From the Bury Free Press of Friday, January 23

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A selection of readers’ letters from the Bury Free Press of Friday, January 23.

SEARCHING FOR MATCH REPORTS

Bury St Edmunds FC  c1898 ANL-150120-102401001

Bury St Edmunds FC c1898 ANL-150120-102401001

I write an article in every Bury Town programme on the history of the football club . It has been difficult obtaining information on all their matches played during the 1978-79 and 1979-80 seasons as local newspapers were not printed every week during the season due to industrial action being taken. I am hoping that one of your readers may have results and goalscorers from matches played towards the end of the 1979-80 season.

Bury Town went on a tour to Holland during April 1979, playing two matches, winning one of the matches 10-0 and the other 5-0. Although I have managed to find the results of the two matches played I have been unable to ascertain details of the opposition.

I am also keen to add to my collection of Bury Town programmes and photographs and am hoping that some of your readers may have old programmes that they are willing to sell. While I have struggled to find information on the club’s 1979 tour to Holland I was more successful in locating information on a club tour taken to Belgium in 1898. Bury St Edmunds Football Club played two matches in Belgium. The first match took place on Monday 18th April 1898 against the Racing Club of Brussels. The match ended 1-1 with Salmon scoring for Bury. The following day, Bury played Antwerp winning 3-2 with goals from Pritchett, Sellicks and Salmon. If any reader can assist with the missing information or has programmes they are willing to sell, I can be contacted on 01284 727734 or at davidcull@btinternet.com

-- David Cull, Bury Town FC

MOST VIGIL ATTENDEES STOOD IN SILENCE

We were concerned to read the letter (Bury Free Press, January 16) from someone who had attended the vigil in response to the atrocities carried out in Paris.

This was clearly advertised as a silent vigil. We too were disappointed that some participants initially chattered, but most of those taking part stood in silence, respectfully remembering those who had been murdered, as well as the families and friends – themselves innocent and grieving – of those who perpetrated these terrible acts. After a time, the example of the majority of those holding the silence of the vigil quietened those who were talking, without having to disrupt our own silence. We were moved by the numbers of people, from Amnesty, faith groups and from the general public who joined us.

Photographs were taken in order to inform others, including the press, of the heartfelt support shown by the public; the photograph and accompanying article in the Bury Free Press showed this clearly.

The Amnesty group continues to work in support of all victims of human rights abuses. Amnesty will be represented at the Holocaust Memorial Day service this month in the Abbey Gardens, which is the official ‘unveiling’, of the Memorial Peace garden, commemorating the massacre of local Jews in 1190, and all victims of genocide and inhumanity. Among other activities, another vigil is planned by our group for later this year, to remember all victims of terrorism, violence and other abuses of human rights. We would encourage as many as possible to join us in respectful silence.

-- Avril Dawson, Chairman, Amnesty International, Bury St Edmunds

KEEPING THE MEMORY ALIVE

On Holocaust Memorial Day, on January 27, hundreds of thousands of people will gather at over 2,400 events across the country to mark 70 years since the liberation of the Nazis’ most notorious killing site Auschwitz-Birkenau.

These events will allow people to come together to remember and honour the millions killed in the Holocaust and in subsequent genocides. Candles designed by award-winning sculptor Sir Anish Kapoor will be lit at 70 special commemorations around the UK and at Auschwitz itself symbolically linking them on this important anniversary.

It is vital that we all remember and reflect upon the horrors of the past, and honour those who survived. Many survivors will be speaking about their experiences at events in schools, in cinemas and local communities. By hearing, seeing and sharing these powerful stories and memories, we are challenged to confront all forms of hatred and discrimination wherever we see them. Play your part by attending a local event – listed here, hmd.org.uk – or reading a survivor story on keepthememoryalive.hmd.org.uk and sharing it with others.

-- Olivia Marks-Woldman, Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

NOT EVERYONE IS DISAPPOINTED

Copy of letter sent to Cllr David Gathercole, Forest Heath District Council, RE ‘Tesco shelves store’ (Bury Free Press, Mildenhall edition, January 16).

I wish to point out that contrary to you and your colleague’s assertions not all residents of Lakenheath are ‘disappointed’ by this news; indeed I would go so far as to say some are delighted, particularly those whom this monster most impacted upon – namely the residents of both Dumpling Bridge Lane and Anchor Lane. Of course, I don’t expect you to understand or appreciate the relief as you don’t live in the village.

As I have expressed to your colleague Cllr Waters, before making any decision with Tesco or any other regarding the future of the buildings and land, could you at least engage those who it really impacts upon, namely the residents of the area indicated above, I doubt you will but you don’t get if you don’t ask.

Finally, to be absolutely clear, I do not wish for the failed Tesco venture to be replaced by another superstore. I am, however, happy to support any application any of the supermarkets wish to submit for stores that back directly on to your or Cllr Waters’ properties presenting you with the noise and nuisance you both seem so keen to impose on me.

-- Stuart Cheslett, via email

DANGEROUS PARKING

Cars that are parked irresponsibly on pavements can cause a potentially dangerous obstruction for pedestrians as it can force them on to the road and into the path of vehicles.

Newly released research by YouGov has shown that three quarters (74 per cent) of people are affected by vehicles parked on the pavement. Some groups – including people living with sight loss, older people or those with buggies – are at greater risk. Some 91 per cent of respondents living with sight loss who responded to a Guide Dogs survey said that parked cars on the pavement regularly obstructed them.

You can see how dangerous pavement parking can be in real-life video footage, filmed from a guide dog’s view, of a guide dog and its owner having to go out into the road to get around a car at www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMQt-cfEFsg

I am urging the public to ensure they don’t park on the pavement.

-- Deborah Johnson, Bury St Edmunds

CATHEDRAL EVENT WILL HELP FOCUS 12

I was rather surprised and disappointed, that Simon Harding took such a negative view, (Letters, January 16) of the Focus 12 charity event taking place in the cathedral later this year.

This is the kind of event that brings people together, to raise much needed funds, for Focus 12.

Yes they will have an enjoyable evening, including food and drink, and why not.

I have attended many such charity events, I am supporting this one, by donating one of my limited edition, signed and framed Beatles photographs for the auction.

Such events bring together so many different groups and people and many become friends of the charity after such events.

The event raises much-needed funds and guests have a great night out in the splendid venue of the cathedral. Church and charity working together, to help people with serious personal demons, what better excuse to meet and donate to Focus 12.

-- Tom Murray, Howard Estate, Bury St Edmunds

PEOPLE SHOWED SUCH KINDNESS

I would just like express my sincerest thanks to those unknown Bury residents who helped me and my disabled wife when I fell from my car and fractured my shoulder outside Cutting Edge hair salon at 1pm on Christmas Eve.

Soon after I hit the ground, people gathered around to help.

Who was the lady with the lovely soothing voice who crouched behind my head, calmed me, and held my shoulder to avoid any further injury? I never saw you madam, but will never forget your help.

My thanks go also to the first aider from the local Tesco shop who ran to offer more help. To the lady who lived opposite, who ran across the road with a rug to cover me, and then offered to park our car on her driveway if we wished.

To the doctor who appeared from nowhere, quickly assessed my injuries, and called for the ambulance. (I now know who you are sir, but don’t think that I should publish your name, )

To the staff at Cutting Edge salon who looked after my wife, who has multiple sclerosis, and even delivered our car home for us after the ambulance took us to the West Suffolk.

Finally, to all those others who were so kind and helpful.

We spent the whole of Christmas in and out of A&E so that we didn’t even get to pull a cracker!

But the wonderful support that we received from all those Bury resident’s more than made up for it. Having restored my faith in human kindness, and made us both more than happy that we live in such a great town. Is it the town, I wonder, or the folks that live here?

-- Frank and John Bishop, via email

WONDERFUL TREATMENT

We hear enough grumbles about our health services, but my experience was the opposite.

I was ambulanced to West Suffolk Hospital on December 27 with severe pain. The crew were wonderful. I was treated in the A&E as fast as possible with queues building up. Four hours later I was in a ward.

I would like to say a big thank you to every one involved, including those behind the scenes analysing blood etc.

-- J Greenwood, via email

DRIVER SARAH’S CHRISTMAS SPIRIT

I am writing to tell you about a good Samaritan. On Christmas Eve, my son was taking me to physio after an operation at West Suffolk Hospital but his car broke down on the way. We phoned various people but they were out or already on the phone. A lady going in the opposite direction turned round and offered help. She took me to physio even though it was out of her way. I would like to say a big thank you to Sarah for showing true Christmas spirit.

-- Stella Drew, Bury St Edmunds

REQUESTS FOR FUNDS WELCOMED

As your readers may know, Bury St Edmunds Round Table organises the annual fireworks spectacular in the Abbey Gardens. Money raised from this event and others is distributed locally throughout the year. We welcome funding requests from local bona fide good causes. As a guide, we prefer to fund tangible capital items which will benefit others into the future (rather than covering operating costs) and typical grants are in the range of £50 to £500. We also very much welcome new members. Please contact me directly at chairman@buryroundtable.co.uk.

-- Dr Jonathan Symonds, Bury St Edmunds Round Table

FOOTBRIDGE IS A LESSON TO US ALL

As long as anyone can remember, there has been a risk of being run over when attempting to cross the road on the blind corner opposite the Nowton bus shelter. Nobody knew how to solve the problem until a young man suggested: ‘Build a bridge’. Despite universal scorn and considerable opposition, it has taken five whole years before a safe crossing point with a footbridge could eventually be built. It was completed last Saturday.

A large family of children, parents and dogs from Bury were out for a brisk morning walk in the frost last weekend were happily surprised to find that they were the first people to inaugurate this vital footbridge and path as they happily skipped across into Nowton Park.

Let this be a lesson for all. When the cause is right, ‘Never take no for an answer’.

-- Richard Hopking, Nowton