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Truck convoy says farewell to haulage industry legend Andrew ‘Freddie’ Leggett from Woolpit




Truck funeral procession. Andrew (known as Fred) Leggett, of Woolpit, died of bowel cancer on November 22 at the age of 56. He used to be a director of Leggett Transport, which was started by his grandfather, Daniel Leggett and is now Gold Star, in Woolpit. ANL-161112-182914009
Truck funeral procession. Andrew (known as Fred) Leggett, of Woolpit, died of bowel cancer on November 22 at the age of 56. He used to be a director of Leggett Transport, which was started by his grandfather, Daniel Leggett and is now Gold Star, in Woolpit. ANL-161112-182914009

Truck drivers paid their own special farewell to leading light of the road haulage industry, Freddie Leggett from Woolpit, who died last month aged 56.

Some 32 lorries rode out in convoy from Woolpit to Risby on Saturday to say goodby Mr Leggett who ran Leggett’s Transport and drove trucks all his life.

Freddie Leggett pictured here with one of his seven grandsons Connor
Freddie Leggett pictured here with one of his seven grandsons Connor

Mr Leggett died on November 22 after battling bowel cancer. He leaves two children, Stephen and Leanne and seven grandchildren.

The Street in Woolpit was closed off for the convoy and trucks bearing black ribbons converged on the village before a service at St Mary’s. This was taken by the Rev Ruth Farrell. Freddie’s coffin, on the back of an SJH truck driven by family friend Simon Hutchinson was then carried down the A14 followed by the convoy to West Suffolk Crematorium.

As it arrived Simon pulled into the entrance and each truck drove slowly past sounding its horn in final tribute.

Leggett’s Transport was officially founded by Freddie’s grandfather Bertie Freeman Leggett in 1918 when he and his father invested in a horse and cart. At the end of the war Bertie invested in his first lorry and the business grew from there being run by his son Daniel in the 1940s.

Andrew (Fred) Leggett grew up with lorries and drove them throughout his life, working for Leggett’s Transport when he left school and going on to become a director.

When the company went into liquidation Freddie went on to work for Gold Star in Woolpit on the site of his former company.

His daughter, Leanne said of him in a video of the funeral convoy: “He was a fun guy with a big personality. There was never a dull moment when he was around. He loved to be on the road in his lorry.”

She said of the convoy: “Words cannot describer how we felt - it was a great tribute. There were people watching on the bridges over the A14 and trucks driving past in the opposite direction all sounded their horns to show respect. Dad would have loved it.”

Other tributes were paid by colleagues from the industry on the Trucking TV video on Facebook.

Sean Hawes, one of the organisers of the convoy, said: “ He was a great man in the industry. He was a cheeky chappy and always had to have a laugh. He was the life and soul of the party.”

The funeral directors were Fulchers of Bury St Edmunds.



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