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Thetford war brothers story to be told




Rosemary Snowdon with her great uncle’s medals which will be displayed at the Charles Burrell Centre for the World War One event. PICTURE: Mecha Morton
Rosemary Snowdon with her great uncle’s medals which will be displayed at the Charles Burrell Centre for the World War One event. PICTURE: Mecha Morton

A display about four Thetford men who fought in World War One has an extra story to tell.

The Charles Burrell Centre, in Staniforth Road, is holding a commemoration event tomorrow, including an exhibition about the Muteham Brothers.

Siblings Bertie, George, Joe and Arthur left the town to fight on the Western Front, with Arthur the only survivor.

Rosemary Snowdon, who will talk at the event and is great niece of the fallen brothers, said: “They did it without a second thought, not fully understand what they were going into but did it for King and country, we are very proud of them for that.”

Items will include photographs and paper work from them, but the medals going on display have a tale all of their own.

The family had Joe’s and George’s but thought Bertie’s was lost forever, that was until 2015 when local historian Darren Norton wrote on Facebook that it was on eBay.

The Snowdons eventually won the medal for £127, on top of that another bidder on the item contacted them to say they had his ‘death penny’, which was a memorial plaque issued to the next-of-kin of British personnel.

Mrs Snowdon said: “It was lucky as we had no idea where to start looking for it and it is wonderful to know we now have the full set.”

Rosemary’s 96 year-old mother, Dorothy, who was Arthur’s daughter will also be attending the display.

Mrs Snowdon said: “She is very proud and it means a great deal to her that other people are so interested.

“I also feel it is so important people never forget the personal sacrifices made.”

An article from August 31, 1917, when the Bury Free Press was the Bury and Norwich Post, said Private Bertie Muteham, of the Norfolk Regiment, was shot and killed on August 11 whilst trying to give covering fire at the Third Battle of Ypres in Passchendaele, Belgium.

George and Joe died just after the war had finished in 1918, as they were still in active service they were considered ‘war dead’.

This November, Rosemary and eldest son Keith, who keeps the collection, have been invited to lay a wreath and walk in the Armistice Day Parade in London for the brothers.

The display will be at the Charles Burrell Centre tomorrow for the Breckland World War One event between 10am and 3pm.



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