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Barrow teenager Sasha Campbell's mental health battle inspires new campaign with first public event in Bury St Edmunds on May 18




A teenager’s battle with mental ill-health has inspired a new campaign to provide early intervention for young people who are struggling with the condition.

Sasha Campbell, of Barrow, grappled with her illness for four years until she was admitted into a mental health unit last summer.

To lift her spirits, her mum Jordanna promised her ‘we’re going to change the world together’, which sparked the ‘Fine Not Fine’ campaign.

Di Kennedy, Sasha’s brother Isaac, mum Jordanna, dad Donald, Liz Cooke, Eva Allan, Jess Gottgens, brother Hamish and Millie Cooke Wharton prepare for the Fine Not Fine campaign. Picture by Mark Westley.
Di Kennedy, Sasha’s brother Isaac, mum Jordanna, dad Donald, Liz Cooke, Eva Allan, Jess Gottgens, brother Hamish and Millie Cooke Wharton prepare for the Fine Not Fine campaign. Picture by Mark Westley.

Inspired by Sasha’s creative talents, it aims to use the arts to help teachers, parents and carers recognise the early signs of mental illness, empower young people to seek help and support schools and colleges with the provision of mental health professionals.

Sasha, 18, said: “I’m really excited about the campaign because when I was at one of my units myself and my mum came to the realisation that we wanted to use my experience to make a difference.

“It helped me along the recovery because I wanted to make a change and it gave me something to focus on.

“I want to raise awareness of how big a problem it is. I would like more intervention in schools so they can open their eyes a little bit and know what they’re looking for.”

Sasha Campbell.
Sasha Campbell.

Sasha is due to take part in the campaign’s first public event in Bury St Edmunds’ arc shopping centre on Saturday, May 18, with events and activities from 10am to 5pm.

The day will offer the chance to talk to mental health professionals, write postcards to MPs Jo Churchill and Matt Hancock to encourage them to lobby the Government to improve mental health services and write a message on a positivity tree.

There will also be music, dance and theatre and Sasha is due to play cello and read some poetry for which she was recently named a finalist in the Wicked Young Writer Awards.

Jordanna, 48, added: “It’s vital that when a young person’s mental health begins to fail, it is spotted quickly and treated quickly.”



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