Former clinical lead at West Suffolk Hospital’s SCBU is ending her nursing career after 50 years

May Lin Golsing with baby Nyla and mum Amy Earl at The Rosie Maternity Hospital at  Addenbrooke's, Cambridge. May Lin is retiring from nursing after 50 years, most spent as a neo-natal nurse and manager
May Lin Golsing with baby Nyla and mum Amy Earl at The Rosie Maternity Hospital at Addenbrooke's, Cambridge. May Lin is retiring from nursing after 50 years, most spent as a neo-natal nurse and manager
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A woman who has cared for seriously ill and premature babies for most of her working life is to retire after 50 years in nursing.

May Lin Gosling came to Britain from her native Singapore to train as a nurse and began her career on September 5 1966 at the former Royal West Sussex Hospital in Chichester.

Her passion was caring for babies in neonatal units including the Special Care Baby Unit at West Suffolk Hospital.

Today she is working at the Rosie Hospital in Cambridge looking after neonatal babies and will finally leave work at the end of November.

She said: “The best bit of working is the babies. I love them and you share the emotional times with the family. There are bad times and there are happy times.”

May Lin, who lives in Bury with husband Mel, has worked around the country following Mel who served in the RAF.

She met Mel in the early 70s when she was with the International Grenfell Mission at Goose Bay, Labrador, working with the Inuit people, Red Indians and white settlers. He was stationed there.

She spent six years at SCBU at West Suffolk Hospital as senior clinical lead between 2001 and 2007 during which time the Bury Free Press and its readers raised more than £20,000 for a neonatal scanner for the unit.

In 2007 she officially retired but wanted to carry on working and has been at the Rosie since then.

“I went straight back to work as I realised I was too young and didn’t feel ready to give up. It was difficult for me to stay on at West Suffolk as the staff knew me as a manager so I went to work at the Rosie.”

Now at 69 she has decided it is time to stop nursing. “I feel it’s time to go. I’m not looking forward to it to be quite fair.

“I left Bury nine years ago but I see parents in Bury and they give me updates on their children and that’s nice. I love the community spirit here, the closeness of the place.”

The couple have two children and six grandchildren.