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Drivers urged to drive smarter and safer by students from West Suffolk




Students from four primary schools have been out encouraging drivers to think about the toxic fumes their cars emit.

Pupils from Guildhall Feoffment, St Edmunds, Great Barton and West Row Academy were outside their schools handing out informative leaflets, encouraging drivers not to ‘idle’ - when drivers leave their engines running whilst stationary - and thanking those who weren’t.

Idling is a common problem amongst parents and grand-parents dropping off and collecting children from school, and something which could simultaneously cause the children lifelong respiratory problems.

Public Health England estimate air pollution contributes to the deaths of 40,000 people a year (31155995)
Public Health England estimate air pollution contributes to the deaths of 40,000 people a year (31155995)

Students were accompanied by teachers and West Suffolk Council environment officers as part of continuing town hall commitments to improve air quality levels across the district.

Caroline Dunne, class teacher from Guildhall Feoffment, said: “Our pupils are very environmentally aware - we have our own eco council – and we are delighted to be working with the council on this initiative. It already feels like it has had a positive impact as people become more aware of the harm that idling causes.”

The council says that, in some vehicles, just a minute of leaving the engine running whilst stationary can produce enough toxic emissions to fill 60 people’s lungs.

Many parents and grandparents leave their cars running whilst they're collecting children (31155828)
Many parents and grandparents leave their cars running whilst they're collecting children (31155828)

On a national level idling is linked to air pollution which Public Health England estimates helps contribute to around 40,000 deaths every year.

Cllr Andy Drummond said turning your car engine off whilst waiting outside school for your child or grandchild is a simple thing that can ‘make a huge difference.’

The anti-idling campaign is part of the wider work of the council to cut carbon emissions and improve air quality, which has included investment in solar energy and electric vehicle charging points.


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