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Councillors look to appeal lorry permit after ‘ludicrous decision’




Fornham All Saints: Village sign beside the church'Fornham All Saints, Bury Saint Edmunds IP28 6JY, UK'Howard Quayle chair PC with councillors Jill Mayhew and Bernard Grimshaw beside village sign by church in Fornham All Saints - where lorries have been wreaking havoc and a new permit has recently been granted to allow free travel movements for Eastern Concrete lorries. 'Picture Mark Westley
Fornham All Saints: Village sign beside the church'Fornham All Saints, Bury Saint Edmunds IP28 6JY, UK'Howard Quayle chair PC with councillors Jill Mayhew and Bernard Grimshaw beside village sign by church in Fornham All Saints - where lorries have been wreaking havoc and a new permit has recently been granted to allow free travel movements for Eastern Concrete lorries. 'Picture Mark Westley

Parish councillors are looking into ways to appeal a permit allowing lorries to travel through Fornham All Saints, which was granted without consulting them.

Councillor Elizabeth Hodder has branded the decision by Suffolk County Council to grant Eastern Concrete lorries unlimited travel movement through the village until 2019 as ‘scandalous’ and one which will be the ‘ruination’ of the village.

“This is a ludicrous decision by Highways. If you go through the village it’s always full of artics and traffic that is not meant to go through the village. And with the Eastern Concrete lorries thundering through it, it’s just going to get worse,” she said.

This comes after several complaints from residents and councillors in Bury St Edmunds and the surrounding area about lorries wreaking havoc in small residential roads over the last month.

“People are already being woken up by the flow of traffic coming through the village and if you try to cross the road you are taking your life into your own hands,” said Cllr Hodder.

“The whole village is just being ruined by one decision after another by Highways.”

Chairman Cllr Howard Quayle also identified alternative routes which lorries could take that would bypass the town and avoid disruption, namely taking the B1106 and A134.

In a statement issued by the parish council, Cllr Quayle said: “The parish council has complained to Suffolk Highways about the granting of a temporary Exemption Permit to Eastern Concrete (for an indefinite number of loads up to 2019), and has also noted an increasing number of HGVs flouting the 7.5T weight limit on the B1106 through the village.”

Matthew Allen, commercial manager of Eastern Concrete, said: ““Eastern concrete have been issued permits to use the B1106 by the local Highways Authority. This is limited and monitored to a specific amount of journeys.

“We applied for this for two reasons; firstly to lessen the environmental impact of using less appropriate routes in the surrounding area and also to minimise road miles and traffic congestion.

“All our drivers are well trained and are mindful when using this route to take extra care. No deliveries are made to or from the new construction site at Marham Park.”

A spokesperson from Suffolk County Council said: “Operator licenses for heavy good’s vehicles are issued by the Traffic Commissioner for the East of England, who consults with us.”



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