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Children tell the story of Ramadan’s meaning




A girl takes part in the section explaining God's creation of the world (2091376)
A girl takes part in the section explaining God's creation of the world (2091376)

When Bury St Edmunds' Muslim community decided to hold a multi-faith event to explain Ramadan they let their children tell the story.

Called Knock, Knock it's Ramadan, Saturday's event at Bury's United Reformed Church, was organised by Bury Muslims and West Suffolk Interfaith and Community Forum (WSICF).

Mo Ismail, a trustee of both organisations, explained: "What we wanted was to educate people what Ramadan is but, like a nativity play with Jesus, we wanted the children to show what it is about."

The children came up with many of the ideas, mentored by the adults. However, as so many children wanted to do something that involved wearing costumes, they included the story of God's creation of the world, which is similar to the Christian and Jewish version.

As it was interdenominational, they were rehearsed by Methodist musician Clare Mellor with Ishara Ali.

Some of those involved in the Ramadan event Knock, Knock it's Ramadan. Picture by Mark Westley (2091397)
Some of those involved in the Ramadan event Knock, Knock it's Ramadan. Picture by Mark Westley (2091397)

WSICF chairman Chris Andrews welcomed everyone to the event, then handed over to the children.

Mo said: "There were some nerves on the day, but they did well."

The children explained how and why Muslims fast during Ramadan, which is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and the month in which the faith's holy book, the Koran, was revealed.

Mo explained that fasting mainly teaches self control and discipline. Followers eat and drink nothing from sunrise to sunset.

He added: "It's about mind over matter if you want to achieve a target, there's a cost.

"It also helps you identify with poor people who don't have enough. After 18 hours fasting, you realise how important food is."

Ramadan this year began on May 17 and continues to June 15 then it ends with the Eid celebration on June 16.

  • More pictures in Friday's Bury Free Press.


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