Bury St Edmunds charity kits out TT racing team

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A Bury St Edmunds man will lead his team into one of the world’s most prestigious motorcycle races in official kit produced by a local charity.

Jimmy Mann, 69, is managing the GO GP team, which will compete in the world famous Isle of Mann TT Race in June.

He will lead his eight man F2 sidecar team into the TT races – on a powerful 600cc K7 Suzuki machine – wearing kit made to order by the commercial embroidery department of Workwise.

The Bury-based charity specialises in helping people recovering from mental ill health by providing a range of vocational and educational support. It operates a number of industry standard workshops, such as its commercial embroidery department, which function as real businesses.

Mr Mann, who himself competed in the famous race on numerous occasions between 1966 and 1979, said: “When I heard about Workwise I decided to see if they could help me to produce the kit I needed for this year’s event and when I actually saw how it operates I was truly impressed.

“The service it provides is as professional as anything else I have come across and I am absolutely delighted what they have produced for the team. It is exactly what I was looking for.

“Workwise is a fantastic cause, doing such a great job for the local community, so I am more than happy to be supporting it. However, it is the standard of the work it produces which has impressed me more than anything else. It is first class.”

Valerie Beresford, chief executive of Workwise, said: “We are delighted Jimmy approached us and it is so exciting to think our work will be on display at such a prestigious event. The fact Jimmy is so please with what we have produced just goes to show our professionalism and capabilities which we are extremely proud of.”

Since being established in 1986, Workwise has helped more than 5,000 people with long-term mental ill health get back into work, gain qualifications or to take part in community activities.

Each year almost 50 people gain a national qualification through training provided from Workwise, many of whom go on to further education.

In the past year alone, the charity has helped 66 of its trainees into paid employment, 82 into work-based training and another 63 into voluntary positions.

For more information on the charity, go to www.workwisesuffolk.org.uk