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Bury’s Cornhill Walk set to lose ‘gimmicky’ front




Cavendish and Gloucester Properties computer images of how it would like Cornhill Walk in Bury St Edmunds to look
Cavendish and Gloucester Properties computer images of how it would like Cornhill Walk in Bury St Edmunds to look

The company behind the redevelopment of Cornhill Walk has revealed its ideas for the town centre site.

London-based Cavendish and Gloucester Properties has been talking to St Edmundsbury Borough Council about ideas for the small shopping mall in off Bury St Edmunds’ Buttermarket.

Cavendish and Gloucester Properties computer images of how it would like Cornhill Walk in Bury St Edmunds to look
Cavendish and Gloucester Properties computer images of how it would like Cornhill Walk in Bury St Edmunds to look

Managing director Peter Murphy said: “We want to get away from the gimmicky 1980s frontage. We want a more conventional looking front – we think it suits it.

“The whole concept now is outdated. We’re expecting to have two or three big shops in there and we’re looking at residential on the upper floors.

“There’s an awful lot of incredibly wasted space in there. In those days they had enormous storage space but now it’s all ‘just in time’ delivery.”

He said there were no plans to build it higher because they had to ‘respect the views of the cathedral’. If they did add any accommodation on the roof, it would not be visible from street level.

Cavendish and Gloucester Properties computer images of how it would like Cornhill Walk in Bury St Edmunds to look
Cavendish and Gloucester Properties computer images of how it would like Cornhill Walk in Bury St Edmunds to look

Mr Murphy said they had a gym showing an interest along with some small stores, even though the plans were at a very early stage.

“We’ve had a chat with the council and they have a nice attitude,” he added. “I must say, unlike London, the attitude of the council and county council has been helpful – they’re as keen to get an end to it as we are.

“There are a number of issues including parking, which I think we’ve solved, and heritage – the impact on local listed buildings.”

“It’s a nice job in a nice town. It will add to the street scene and to shop availability.

“We get a lot of satisfaction from seeing a job well done and adding something – it’s not just about profit.”

The company will have to apply for planning permission.



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