VIDEO: The Airbus now landing in Bury is destined for your garden

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As David Palmer’s new company took its first big delivery, he admitted he had never been so nervous, but then it was a 14m by 4m section of Airbus A320 fuselage.

The plan is that DappR Aviation, which moved into Western Way, Bury St Edmunds three weeks ago will turn it into its signature product, a stylish garden building called an Aeropod.

The Airbus sections arrive outside DappR Aviation's workshop

The Airbus sections arrive outside DappR Aviation's workshop

David said: “We can take the fuselage and make fantastically well engineered buildings. They are fully insulated, made from aviation grade aluminium and designed to fly at 30,000 feet.

“The possibilities are endless – garden offices, poolside relaxation areas, the ultimate man cave. We’ve already been asked if we could make a double pod and fit it out as a home cinema.”

But first, you have to get it in the workshop. The first fuselage sections came from an aircraft recycling specialist in Gloucestershire by low loader and were manoeuvred into the workshop entrance by the the lorry’s crane.

But then it was down to muscle power to shift the sections into the workshop, with inches to spare on the largest.

DappR Aviation managing director David Palmer with a prototype lamp made from an aircraft part

DappR Aviation managing director David Palmer with a prototype lamp made from an aircraft part

They joined a selection of aircraft parts already there, ranging from food trollies to an Airbus rudder from Vladivostock. Not all the parts are Airbus: there are Boeing 737 undercarriage legs, for example.

David also runs the IT recycling company We Want Your IT and had the DappR idea when asked if he could recyle aircraft electronics.

The company’s co-founder Andrew Dahl said: “We’ve got a lot of other aircraft parts to use in creative and imaginative ways.”

He points to an engine cover and says: “Imagine that as a curved seat.”

How the finished DappR Aeropod will look

How the finished DappR Aeropod will look

They plan to turn a beautifully engineered, circular engine component into a glass topped table and already have a prototype lamp made from a leading edge slat and a desk made from a lightweight composite flap. Many of the parts look heavy but are surprisingly light because they are made of composites, aluminium or titanium.

The parts are either damaged or have been repaired and their safety certificates have now run out.

Ironically, it is a return to aviation for their workshop. Now part of the Green Duck complex, it was once home of Thales who made electronics pods for military aircraft.

DappR will have open days on June 6 and 7 so everyone can see what they are working with and have launched a website at www.dappr-aviation.com

Gently does it as the lorry's crane is used to edge the fusalage section into the woekshop door

Gently does it as the lorry's crane is used to edge the fusalage section into the woekshop door