Snowdrops make ‘unprecedented’ early arrival at garden

Snowdrops have stared to bloom in the garden of Bernard Tickner. They don't normally bloom until mid October''Pictured: Annie Dellbridge, Head Gardener at Fullers Garden
Snowdrops have stared to bloom in the garden of Bernard Tickner. They don't normally bloom until mid October''Pictured: Annie Dellbridge, Head Gardener at Fullers Garden
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UNUSUAL weather patterns this year are being held responsible for the early arrival of snowdrops in one West Stow garden.

On Sunday, when the temperature in Brooms Barn, near Bury St Edmunds, dropped as low as 10.7C, three beautiful white snowdrop flowers were spotted open in Fullers Mill Garden, with others expected to follow over the next few days.

Snowdrops have stared to bloom in the garden of Bernard Tickner. They don't normally bloom until mid October''Pictured: Bernard Tickner

Snowdrops have stared to bloom in the garden of Bernard Tickner. They don't normally bloom until mid October''Pictured: Bernard Tickner

Bernard Tickner, who bought Fullers Mill in 1958, says that in his 53 years there he had never seen a snowdrop so early.

“It’s quite unprecedented, we’d never expect a snowdrop to be in bloom before mid October,” he said.

“The only reason we can think of is in the early part of the year it was very hot and sunny, exceptionally so, and dry, so from the bulb’s point of view it got well ripened and imagined it had been through a hot summer and with the cold weather we’ve had it expects that winter’s come,” he added.

In June, Brooms Barn reached 32.3C.

Fullers Mill’s head gardener Annie Dellbridge said: “We have had a hot spring and a cold spell and they probably thought autumn was here and just got confused by our confusing weather.”

“We were worried in spring, thinking they haven’t had long enough to grow, but actually it doesn’t seem to have affected them, just brought them out early – we’re totally excited about it all.”