Retailers help school to show value of maths

Enterprise Week at Walsham le Willows Primary.''FL; Pupils make Origami pupets to sell at the entreprise fare with help from Miss Walker and and Lovell Jones ftrom John Lewis.
Enterprise Week at Walsham le Willows Primary.''FL; Pupils make Origami pupets to sell at the entreprise fare with help from Miss Walker and and Lovell Jones ftrom John Lewis.

COMPANIES can help schools to show children the value of maths, a head teacher has said.

Angela Hunter, head of Walsham-le-Willows Primary School, has urged more companies to partner schools in enterprise competitions following the success of one at her school backed by retailers John Lewis.

Enterprise Week at Walsham le Willows Primary.''FL; Liam Ludlam ,8 advertises Ice cones for sale.

Enterprise Week at Walsham le Willows Primary.''FL; Liam Ludlam ,8 advertises Ice cones for sale.

During its enterprise week, the school was divided into four mixed-age groups. Each had to choose a name, decide on a product and its pricing then sell it at the school summer fair.

Mrs Hunter said: “This way all the children are working together and they’re seeing how maths helps in real life.”

One of the school governors works for John Lewis which sent staff along to launch the week and to return last Tuesday to give prizes to the best performing ‘business’.

Mrs Hunter said she wished more companies would help schools in this way. “It helps makes maths more meaningful for the pupils.

Enterprise Week at Walsham le Willows Primary.''FL; Isabel Campbell, 3, helps selling cup cakes.

Enterprise Week at Walsham le Willows Primary.''FL; Isabel Campbell, 3, helps selling cup cakes.

“It helps the older ones understand business. They all enjoyed it so much, too.

“Developing business links is something we’ll do more in the future.”

One group decided to sell ice creams after careful research on the cheapest source of supplies, another sold secondhand toys and origami animals and there was a hook-a-duck stall with prizes from home. But the winner was aptly called Money Makers and had a stall selling books and cuddly toys plus a game to play and a tombola.

Money Makers made £60, which was the same amount as the other three stalls together