Posthumous award for first responder

Keith Marshall, left, receiving his special voluntary services award from Anthony Marsh, chief executive of East of England Ambulance Service Trust in 2014.
Keith Marshall, left, receiving his special voluntary services award from Anthony Marsh, chief executive of East of England Ambulance Service Trust in 2014.
0
Have your say

An East of England Ambulance Service Trust (EEAST) volunteer from Wattisham has been posthumously recognised nationally.

Keith Marshall, who volunteered for EEAST for five years was honoured at the Ambulance Leadership Forum awards for his dedicated years of service and ‘massive contribution’ to the service.

Keith Marshall's award being collected by his wife Mary

Keith Marshall's award being collected by his wife Mary

Keith died in November last year and his wife Mary collected the Outstanding Service Award on his behalf on February 8.

He joined the Trust as a Community First Responder (CFR) with his wife. Together they established the Wattisham Community First Responder Group, raising the money required to set the group up and recruited volunteers from the community to be CFRs and help save lives.

A year into his CFR role he attended a 999 emergency and suffered a cardiac arrest whilst attending the patient.

Keith was resuscitated and despite his setback continued making a positive contribution to EEAST.

He stepped down as a CFR but continued to co-ordinate and manage the Wattisham CFR group.

He was also elected as a governor for the Trust when it was applying for NHS Foundation Trust status.

He then joined the Trust’s User Group, helping out at events, taking an active role in the Infection, Prevention and Control group and being a loyal advocate for the Trust at partnership meetings.

In 2014, Keith’s efforts were recognised when he was given the Trust’s Distinguished Service Award, for the effort and value that he gave to the service and to his community.

He continued, with Mary, to give basic life support and defibrillator training in the local community to all kinds of groups, from school children upwards. EEAST chief executive Robert Morton said: “I had the pleasure to meet Keith. His knowledge and expertise made him an incredibly valued asset to the Trust, and we will be forever grateful for the thousands of hours he volunteered to help our service – whether through his community first responder or Trust User Group work. Keith was a friend to the teams that had the pleasure of working with him, and he will be sorely missed.”