Pair jailed for ‘slice him up’ attack on man in Bury flat

Jamie Turner, left, and Richard McClenaghen ANL-150705-164439001
Jamie Turner, left, and Richard McClenaghen ANL-150705-164439001
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Two men have been jailed after beating and stabbing a man in whose flat a friend had died of an overdose.

As Jamie Turner punched and kicked their victim, at a flat in Ridley Road, Bury St Edmunds, he told his co-accused Richard McClenaghen: “Get a knife from the kitchen and slice him up.”

Ipswich Crown Court heard today how McClenaghen did as he was told and during a struggle with Karl Doyle he inflicted serious stab wounds and cuts.

As Turner continued to rain down punches and kicks, McClenaghen then forced a screwdriver into Mr Doyle’s mouth before biting off part of his ear.

Judge John Holt jailed Turner for 10 years and McClenanghen, who was said to have assisted the prosecution, for five years. Both had pleaded guilty to unlawful wounding with intent.

Mr Doyle, who had been confronted by the pair when he answered his front door on the afternoon of November 3 last year, underwent emergency surgery and spent nine days in hospital being treated for three stab wounds to the chest, a collapsed lung, facial lacerations and extensive bruising.

Prosecuting, Marcus Croskill said that before the attack began, Turner and McClenaghen had been drinking and decided to find out what happened when a friend of theirs died from an apparent drug overdose at Mr Doyle’s address.

Mr Croskill said that as the two pushed their way into the flat, Turner had told Mr Doyle: “We’re going to kill you”.

Later in a statement to police, McClenaghen, 47, of no fixed address, admitted to police the attack had been ‘very one sided’.

The attack only ended when Mr Doyle’s phone rang and Turner and McClenaghen left the flat. A short time later they returned but Mr Doyle had locked the door.

Mr Croskill said a neighbour called for an ambulance while police detained Turner and McClenagen who were covered in blood, which they said was a result of them fighting one another.

When interviewed Turner, 44, of Caie Walk, Bury St Edmunds, refused to answer questions and handed police a pre-prepared statement in which he denied the offence.

McClenegen initially said he had been defending himself against Mr Doyle but later made a full statement in which he explain what took place.

Mr Ian James, appearing for McClenaghen, said his client was remorseful and had never intended to inflict any injuries when he went to Mr Doyle’s flat, only wanting to find out what had happened to his friend.

McClenaghen had assisted police in establishing what took place during the attack.

Andrew Shaw, representing Turner, said he had fallen into bad company who dranktoo much and become addicted to drugs.

Mr Shaw said: “His life has been blighted ever since.”

Turner suffered from Huntingtons disease which, in the early stages, can produce violent outbreaks and mood swings, said Mr Shaw. The court heard there is no cure for the hereditary condition.

Jailing both men, Judge John Holt told them that Mr Doyle had in no way been involved in the death of their friend. The attack had left Mr Doyle with breathing difficulties, pains in his chest and anxious about leaving his flat.