GRAHAM TURNER: Pleasure and pain of a walk to work

A personal view
A personal view

Travelling anywhere by car these days is a real chore – both in and out of town any progress seems to be continually thwarted by queues, breakdowns, roadworks and accidents.

One of my big regrets is that I don’t live close enough to work to walk or (a big second best) cycle in each morning and I was surprised at our story last week which showed that a huge proportion of car journeys into Bury were less than three miles – the perfect distance for a brisk walk!

However, navigating a route across busy roads at peak times can be a nightmare so, from a purely safety point of view, I have every sympathy with people who decide to jump into the car instead.

And, as someone who lives in a village with a pathetic bus service, I also completely understand why the car is essential and often the only available mode of transport – spot on Cllr Mark Ereira.

It’s a chicken-and-egg situation – until public transport is improved people will remain in their cars, but unless people use buses and make them profitable, the number of services will continue to decline.

-- I’m afraid I left readers with a bit of a cliffhanger two weeks ago when I described how we were having to make some difficult decisions about our dog following an inconclusive visit to the vet.

In the event, we had the decision taken out of our hands when the poor old thing took a turn for the worse.

Within two or three days she became very ill and weak, eating nothing and drinking only small amounts of water from my cupped hand. So, though heartbreaking, it was not difficult to make the decision to put an end to her suffering.

The vet kindly agreed to come to our house and Janet’s death was swift, painless and peaceful. Stoic to the end, she made no fuss and even managed a very faint wag of the tail for the vet.

It was a very sad day for us all, but we consoled ourselves with the thought that we had given her a good life after an unpromising (and unwanted) start.