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Green Light Trust: Restoring our ancient woods

Frithy Wood, Lawshall

Frithy Wood, Lawshall

Green Light Trust’s work is all about giving people and nature a chance, creating sustainable lives and a future that protects our planet.

Green Light Trust’s work is all about giving people and nature a chance, creating sustainable lives and a future that protects our planet.

Our new project at Frithy Wood, in Lawshall, is a step change for achieving this.

Trees and woodlands are some of the most defining features of Suffolk’s rural landscape. They help to create a sense of place and they provide structure and visual interest in the countryside.

They are also living monuments, recording our history and heritage.

Ancient woodlands are especially significant – these are areas where there is evidence that the land has been continuously wooded since at least the year 1600. These ancient woodlands have provided homes for much of our wildlife. They have also produced products such as timber and firewood and provided shelter for people and livestock. Ancient woodlands are perhaps the ultimate expression of sustainability and are a resource that has benefited past generations and which has the potential to benefit future generations.

With the incessant pressures on our land, sadly many of our ancient woodlands have been lost forever. Others are deteriorating through a lack of management and use. This in turn leads to significant changes in the quality of our countryside. There is increasing concern that without management there is a real risk that the quality of life for future generations will be poorer as a result.

The trust is playing its part to address this decline at Frithy Wood. With support from the Heritage Lottery Fund and other bodies, Green Light is purchasing part of this neglected ancient woodland and will be restoring it to a sustainable condition. A traditional coppicing regime will be re-established. The project will provide many opportunities for young people to work in the wood and learn new skills.

Coppicing

Coppicing involves the cutting back of tree stems to help the trees produce new growth from the stump or roots. Cutting back the stems repeatedly on a cycle of around 10-15 years allows more daylight in. This encourages the regeneration of rare plants such as orchids, oxslips and wood anemones. The cut stems can be used for firewood or to make hurdles and fences.

www.greenlighttrust.org

01284 830829

 

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