New funding stream for schools is borne of technology

Gadget Drive is a new charity that is part of Cash in Your Gadgets. It takes unwanted  old laptops and mobile phones and other electrical devices from schools and organisations and gives them money in return before repairing and then recycling them.
 Pictured: Ashley Payne, manager-founder, Gary Ward business manager, Georgia Beavis, customer service, Jordan Mynott, warehouse manager, Hannah Sowden, customer service manager and Gadget Man.
 Picture Mark Westley
Gadget Drive is a new charity that is part of Cash in Your Gadgets. It takes unwanted old laptops and mobile phones and other electrical devices from schools and organisations and gives them money in return before repairing and then recycling them. Pictured: Ashley Payne, manager-founder, Gary Ward business manager, Georgia Beavis, customer service, Jordan Mynott, warehouse manager, Hannah Sowden, customer service manager and Gadget Man. Picture Mark Westley
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A business based near Haverhill has launched a new service that can help schools raise thousands of pounds from their old mobile phones, laptops and other gadgets.

Cash in your gadgets.co.uk, which began its life in Haverhill in 2012 but is now based in Stambourne, last week started up ‘Gadget Drive,’ in which schools can raise fund by selling unused computers, laptops, mobile phones, digital cameras and games consoles − even if the items are damaged or faulty.

Gadget Drive is one of the first services to enable schools to raise money from old gadgets and help raise awareness among pupils of recycling and the environments.

James Forrest, the co-founder of cash in your gadgets.co.uk, who like his ten members of staff hails from Haverhill, said: “We’ve made it easy for UK schools to get cash for their unused gadgets.

“With schools under pressure to be frugal with their money selling old gadgets could pay for a new mini bus or a refurbishment of the school canteen.”

Cash in your gadgets.co.uk, which also recycles gadgets for businesses and charities and has been featured on Channel 4’s SuperScrimpers and in the Metro newspaper, is the simplest way to raise money from unused gadgets.

Gadget Drive collects gadgets for free and values each one (based on their age, condition and brand). It pays the school within 48 hours and gives them a report listing items donated and how much was paid for them.

Schools can get an idea how much each gadget will be worth by entering details of each gadget into a valuation tool on cash in your gadgets’ website.

A five-year old laptop, for example, may be worth up to £150 if it was a high spec machine when bought new.

An average payment for a laptop is about £60. The average payment for a mobile phone is between £40 and £60, although some Apple and Samsung smartphones can be worth more than £100.

All gadgets have any data removed securely before they are either re-sold or recycled in compliance with data protection regulations.

Schools can promote their fundraising sale on a Facebook page designed by Gadget Drive and encourage staff, parents and businesses to donate items.

The recycling service is easier than private sale. There’s no posting of items or time spent valuing them.