New £23,000 crossing in Bury St Edmunds gives motorists the hump

Steve Long has an estimated �1,000 repair bill for his Audi A6 after it was damaged by the new speed hump in Mount Road, Bury St Edmunds, which he says was  built too high. Picture: Mark Bullimore.
Steve Long has an estimated �1,000 repair bill for his Audi A6 after it was damaged by the new speed hump in Mount Road, Bury St Edmunds, which he says was built too high. Picture: Mark Bullimore.
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A council has been forced to apologise after a new speed hump in Bury St Edmunds damaged motorists’ cars.

Suffolk County Council closed Mount Road on Wednesday and sent workers to ‘rectify’ the hump near the entrance to Priory School, just days after it opened to traffic.

The council is 'rectifying' the new speed hump. 

Picture: Mark Bullimore.

The council is 'rectifying' the new speed hump. Picture: Mark Bullimore.

Two unhappy motorists spoke out this week after they were left with significant repair bills from damage caused by the hump, which they say was built too high and had no warning signs. Both are applying to the council for compensation.

Steve Long, of Thurston, has an estimated £1,000 repair bill after his Audi A6 was damaged on Sunday afternoon.

“I was unaware of the new crossing and while I slowed down when I saw it, I didn’t expect it to be as violent as it was. But I’m obviously not the only one to have done this – there’s oil all over the road and gouges out of the Tarmac,” he said.

Steve returned at 7.30pm to take pictures, only to discover someone from the council there putting out warning signs.

A new speed hump in Mount Road has damaged motorists' cars

A new speed hump in Mount Road has damaged motorists' cars

“I measured it (the hump) and it was 162mm high, when legislation says they should be 100mm max,” added Steve.

Trevor Waspe, of Bridewell Lane, damaged his car at about midnight on Saturday. He managed to drive home – leaving a trail of oil – before walking back.

“I wanted to see if there was a warning sign I’d missed. As I got there another car did exactly the same as I had, so I knew something was wrong,” he said.

A Suffolk County Council spokesman said the £23,000 traffic calming measure had not met ‘our usual high standards’.

“We immediately put out warning signs and have workers out on site today (Wednesday) rectifying the issue. We apologise for any inconvenience caused,” he said, adding that the lead-up to the hump was being resurfaced to make it easier to negotiate, but this would not be billed to the council.