DCSIMG

Heather steps down after 33 years

Heather Corbell is retiring at the end of this term after 32 years of teaching at Hardwick Primary. She started at the school in 1979 and has taught nearly 1000 children from the community.

Heather Corbell is retiring at the end of this term after 32 years of teaching at Hardwick Primary. She started at the school in 1979 and has taught nearly 1000 children from the community.

In the last 33-years, Hardwick Primary School has witnessed numerous changes but there has been one constant presence - teacher Heather Corbell.

The 60-year-old is the longest serving teacher at the Bury St Edmunds school and is preparing to mark the end of an era when she retires at the close of term.

Mrs Corbell, of Horringer, who has taught more than two generations of pupils, said remaining at one school for so long provides true stability in an ever changing profession.

On her decision to retire, she explained: “I’ve reached the right age and I’ve family responsibilities.

“It’s just the right time and although I’ve been a long time in one school the job keeps changing over the years.

“There have been so many changes that you don’t really need to change school. It gives you stability.

“I’ve taught two or more generations of people in this area which is part of that stability.

“A lot of children I’ve taught are now the parents of children I’m teaching. I’ve been very very happpy.”

It follows a 38-year teaching career which started in Andover, in Hampshire.

When asked what she has enjoyed most about teaching, she admits it’s the ability to express what’s important in life.

Mrs Corbell said: “As a teacher you can put yourself across and teach the things you believe are really important.

“I suppose there’s more opportunity to do that in teaching than in some other jobs.

“It’s a great privilege as well as a great responsibility.”

She has taught every age group from reception to Year 8 but has taught Year 4 the most.

It has been the school community which has helped make the job so enjoyable.

She added: “There’s been a great team of colleagues over the years and very supportive families.

“It’s a delight to meet people who you taught several years ago who are now teachers themselves or doctors or nurses.

“It’s so important we all do all the good we can whether it’s in our career or looking forward to doing other things.

“It’s so important that everybody’s part of a community and doing all the good they can in their community.”

Before she leaves though, she has been tasked with one important ingredient in the school calendar - organising the key stage two Christmas show.

When the curtain closes, she deserves to take a bow.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page