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A legacy for daughter Grace as Bury St Edmunds mum is told cancer is terminal

Mark Westley Photography
Amanda Coppins has terminal cancer and has launched a fund-raiser to provide equipment for the hospital pictured with her daughter Grace. ANL-140521-210707009

Mark Westley Photography Amanda Coppins has terminal cancer and has launched a fund-raiser to provide equipment for the hospital pictured with her daughter Grace. ANL-140521-210707009

A mother who has terminal cancer has launched a fund-raising campaign in order to leave a lasting legacy for her nine-year-old daughter.

Amanda Coppins, 44, is being treated at the Macmillan Unit at West Suffolk Hospital after her breast cancer spread to her lungs and liver.

She has been told her cancer is terminal and wants to raise £5,000 so the hospital can purchase a Nautilus machine which speeds up the process of placing a line into cancer patients for chemotherapy treatment.

Amanda, of Moreton Hall said: “I want my beautiful daughter Grace to realise that you can achieve things no matter what - to be proud of what her mum achieved in the end.

“Despite what I have been told I want to still have fun and I want people to smile when they remember me after I am gone.”

“I have always been honest with Grace and we have talked about the funeral which will have a Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory theme.

“I want something positive to come out of it to make Grace a stronger person.”

Amanda discovered a lump in her breast and was referred by her GP straight away. She has type two diabetes and after surgery, chemo and radiotherapy was struggling to breath and doctors discovered the cancer had reached her lungs and liver.

She said on her just giving page: “I am not scared of dying. I know God has his plan for me. And I believe this will inspire my daughter’s future. I just wish I could have seen her grow up but that was not the plan.”

She added: “The staff at the hospital have been like a family to me, from the moment I was diagnosed with breast cancer until now. I never felt like a patient. I have a laugh and a giggle with the nurses and I just want to say thank you and fund-raise for an important piece of equipment.”

She also wants to raise awareness about the importance of looking after yourself. “It wasn’t genetic, I didn’t smoke. For me it was about having the wrong diet and not looking after myself as I was depressed. I don’t think people realise that putting on weight can increase the risk of getting breast cancer.”

Amanda is organising a music evening Three Steps to Heaven on July 11 at Moreton Hall Community Centre. Tickets are £5. To donate to Amanda’s legacy go to www.justgiving/amandacoppins

 

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