Learning charity in farm move appeal

Millennium Farm Trust charity helps people with learning difficulties. Today they were at their allotments at Rede Hall with Farm Helpers and their assistants''Pictured: Farm Helper Jason Soames with Melissa Courtney-Wines (Learning mentor) pulling up some onions
Millennium Farm Trust charity helps people with learning difficulties. Today they were at their allotments at Rede Hall with Farm Helpers and their assistants''Pictured: Farm Helper Jason Soames with Melissa Courtney-Wines (Learning mentor) pulling up some onions
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A FARM charity, which helps people with learning difficulties, is appealing for help as it prepares to move and expand its services.

The Millennium Farm Trust, which was set up 16 years ago, is about to move from Rede to Chevington.

Millennium Farm Trust charity helps people with learning difficulties. Today they were at their allotments at Rede Hall with Farm Helpers and their assistants''Pictured:Dale Lawerence, Farm helper Daron Holden and Jocelyn Pettit (Horticultural manager)

Millennium Farm Trust charity helps people with learning difficulties. Today they were at their allotments at Rede Hall with Farm Helpers and their assistants''Pictured:Dale Lawerence, Farm helper Daron Holden and Jocelyn Pettit (Horticultural manager)

Chairman Tim Freathy said: “At the moment we have probably got a two acre field – the new site will be about the same size but will be more versitile.

“We can only offer horticultural activities at the moment. The Chevington site will allow us to take on more people and to work with animals likes goats, sheep and pigs.”

The trust brings farm workers, support workers and voluteers together to teach farming, rural husbandry and other rural skills.

It clients cultivate land, grow fruit and vegetables, while they also visit other farms to help milk cows, trim hooves, rear pigs, as well as put up fencing and plant trees and wildflowers.

The trust also works making equipment, including sheds and planters to sell.

“There is a whole wealth of medical evidence that demonstrates that working outside like this is really productive to mental health,” said Mr Freathy.

“We see it every day. They are doing something they enjoy and are able to learn at their own pace rather than getting frustrated in a classroom.”

Currently, the charity is limited to helping 10 people a day for two days a week.

The new site will see the launch of a five-day operation, catering for up to 20 people a day.

However, before the autumn move, the charity needs help clearing and preparing the land.

“We are really excited about the move. But there is quite a lot of work to do to prepare the site and getting volunteers to help us is absolutely vital,” Mr Freathy said.

Contact the trust via its website at www.m-f-t.org.uk