Friends celebrate one million Scrabble score

Celia Simms has been playing scrabble with her friend Joan Dungay (from Surrey) for 47 years. At the weekend, during Joan's latest visit, they decided to add up their scores and realised they had a combined score of more than 1 million.''Pictured: Celia Simms and her scrabble board
Celia Simms has been playing scrabble with her friend Joan Dungay (from Surrey) for 47 years. At the weekend, during Joan's latest visit, they decided to add up their scores and realised they had a combined score of more than 1 million.''Pictured: Celia Simms and her scrabble board
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TWO friends, who have been recording their Scrabble scores for 47 years, have finally reached a combined tally of one million.

On Friday, Ceila Simms, of Langham, and her friend Joan Dungay, from Surrey, added their scores together, counting 1,233,592 points and soon realising that they had surpassed their initial goal of one million.

Celia Simms has been playing scrabble with her friend Joan Dungay (from Surrey) for 47 years. At the weekend, during Joan's latest visit, they decided to add up their scores and realised they had a combined score of more than 1 million.''Pictured: The moment in the book when they realised they had, together, scored over One million playing scrabble

Celia Simms has been playing scrabble with her friend Joan Dungay (from Surrey) for 47 years. At the weekend, during Joan's latest visit, they decided to add up their scores and realised they had a combined score of more than 1 million.''Pictured: The moment in the book when they realised they had, together, scored over One million playing scrabble

“We looked at each other and we freaked,” said Mrs Simms.

The 75-year-old fell in love with the board game while living in South Africa with her late husband, who was in the diplomatic service.

After describing the game in a letter to Mrs Dungay, who she met while at college, both aged 14, her friend also bought it.

The pair have never played more than three games in one day but have been known to take it on trips away and to play it on their own, phoning to record the scores in a joint book.

Words have always been important to Mrs Simms, who worked as a journalist and wrote short stories, but she admits her friend, a retired nurse, is the better player.

“We never quarrel and she doesn’t always win but she is better than me,” she said.

The scores have continued this week, with Mrs Dungay already 100 points in the lead.