Temperatures soar as heatwave grips region

Staff at Sealey were treated to a free ice cream as a way of saying thank you for the work during the hot weather after the firm had a couple of good months.
Staff at Sealey were treated to a free ice cream as a way of saying thank you for the work during the hot weather after the firm had a couple of good months.
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SUFFOLK basked in a shimmering heatwave as the seasons collided to produce unprecedented temperatures.

The balmy weather drove legions of people outside to enjoy the last gasps of sun for the year with the mercury hitting 30C in some parts of the region.

Suffolk experiencing a heatwave at the start of October''Pictured: Abbey Gardens

Suffolk experiencing a heatwave at the start of October''Pictured: Abbey Gardens

Heat records for late-September and October were shattered with meteorologists at Wattisham Airfield logging 26.8C on Friday, 27.1C Saturday, 28.2C Sunday and 27.1C Monday.

The previous high for September was 28C in 1959/73 and 25.5C in October 1959.

Meanwhile, Mildenhall bathed in a golden glow with 29C on Friday, 28C Saturday, 29C Sunday and 27C Monday, according to the RAF base.

Among those taking advantage of the Indian summer were the 300 members of staff at Sealey Power Products, in Bury St Edmunds, who were treated to free ice creams by bosses following a record £5.5 million sales figure last month.

Suffolk experiencing a heatwave at the start of October''Pictured: Abbey Gardens

Suffolk experiencing a heatwave at the start of October''Pictured: Abbey Gardens

Sun seekers also flocked to the Abbey Gardens, where the fallen leaves of autumn were soaked in the sun’s molten honey rays.

Damien Parker, parks manager for St Edmundsbury, said: “We’ve never seen that many people on that particular weekend. We’ve even delayed changing our bedding plants in the main central area by a fortnight because they’re looking so good.”

When asked about the volume of heat related call outs over the weekend, a spokeswoman for the East of England Ambulance service said there had been a ‘significant spike’ in calls but it was ‘difficult to quantify a specific cause’.

Anglian Water is still urging residents to be careful with the amount of water they use.

A spokesman said: “We’ve got to start thinking ahead so there’s enough left in the system come next spring.”

With 22.4mm of rainfall, last month was the driest September in Bury since the 12mm recorded in 1997 and 14mm in 2009.