Concerns over ‘awful state’ of Bury St Edmunds beauty spot after trees harvested

St Edmundsbury Borough Council has harvested its crop of Cricket Bat Willows from The Crankles, in Bury St Edmunds ANL-150804-121000001
St Edmundsbury Borough Council has harvested its crop of Cricket Bat Willows from The Crankles, in Bury St Edmunds ANL-150804-121000001
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Council bosses say felled trees at a Bury St Edmunds beauty spot will be removed by the end of this month following concerns by residents.

St Edmundsbury Borough Council started harvesting its crop of Cricket Bat Willows from the Crankles on March 9 with the work licenced by the Forestry Commission.

The site, next to the Abbey Gardens, was due to be restocked with fruit and native hardwood species. However, this work has yet to happen and the remaining felled trees have been stacked on site.

After the issue was brought to the attention of the Bury Free Press, we asked for comments on Facebook.

Alice Cutter said: “It’s terrible, so bad for the town. I wouldn’t want to visit the place if it was left in this state!”

Lizzi Flaherty wrote: “It’s an awful sight. I know (having read the signs) that it was for cricket bats but when are they going to be clearing and replanting as stated?!”

Michelle Parry said: “I often walk/run round the back of abbey gardens to get away from the town centre where I live as it is quiet there, beautiful woodland and often felt you were suddenly in the middle of the countryside. This area has now been completely ruined. It’s been left in an awful state.” Meanwhile, Helen Wildin said: “The site in question is obviously waiting to be cleared. Be patient. Fruit trees and bees are on their way!”

Robert Squirrell added: “Look ok to me. No litter laying about, or ground cut up. Whats wrong with it??”

When asked for their views about the site, Andrew Hinchley, chairman of the Bury Water Meadows Group, said: “The BWMG have felt that we had to accept the professional advice given to remove the majority of the cricket willows. We have been given assurances in a substantial planting of new fruit trees which we hope will grow relatively quickly to improve the site.”

A council spokesman said the brushwood will be chipped on site soon and felled trees removed by the end of the month. It will then prepare the site for autumn planting.