Big hair, code breaking and a winning logo at West Suffolk College

Students studying media make-up and hairdressing modellled their creations and posed for photos at the Krazy Horse motorcycle showroom

Students studying media make-up and hairdressing modellled their creations and posed for photos at the Krazy Horse motorcycle showroom

0
Have your say

Big hair, an Enigma machine, creating a logo for an environmental group and making the shortlist for a top award are among the recent activities and achivements at West Suffolk College.

The college, in Bury St Edmunds, has been named a finalist in the prestigious Apprenticeships4England annual awards.

Callan Norton receives his prize from Claire Dickson

Callan Norton receives his prize from Claire Dickson

It is one of four finalists in the category for colleges with under 1,500 apprenticeships.

Phil Stittle, director of business development for the college, said: “It’s brilliant to be shortlisted. We work extremely hard to be very responsive to employers and deliver high quality training to apprenticeships.”

There has been further success at the college after student Callan Norton, 18, won a competition to design a logo for the River Lark Catchment Partnership (RLCP).

For his water droplet design, Callan, of Bury, was presented with a £50 Amazon voucher by Claire Dickson, area rights of way officer for Suffolk County Council and a member of the partnership.

Students use a code breaking Enigma machine at Bletchley Park

Students use a code breaking Enigma machine at Bletchley Park

He also took the logo with him to a university interview and has been offered a place to study graphic design at Norwich University of the Arts.

The RLCP is made up of organisations and individuals who work together to deal with environmental challenges facing the River Lark.

Students studying media make-up and hairdressing modelled a variety of colourful creations and posed for those on the photography course, who snapped away at the Krazy Horse motorcycle showroom, in Bury.

Meanwhile, computing students visited Bletchley Park and used a real Enigma machine.

The 36 students went to the home of the British code breaking efforts during World War Two.

They took part in a cyber security workshop, completing various code breaking activities and got to use the Enigma machine.

Student Marc Chapman said: “We learnt lots of historical facts and how important computing was to code breaking and the war effort.”