Anne looks back on being a day bug

Anne Bloomfield has written a book about her school days at the East Anglian School for Girls in Northgate Avenue.
Anne Bloomfield has written a book about her school days at the East Anglian School for Girls in Northgate Avenue.
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ANNE Bloomfield will be signing her new book tomorrow in the shop that made her write it.

She will be in Waterstone’s in Bury St Edmunds’ Buttermarket signing copies of Day Bugs and Boarders. It started life as an entry in a Bury memories competition, run when the store was Ottakers. It recalls her days as a pupil of East Anglian Girls’ School in Northgate Avenue.

“Having done that, I thought I could expand it,”she said. “It’s being published to mark the 40th anniversary of the girls moving to Culford School in 1972.”

Only the headmistress’ house remains of the school, which, at the beginning of World War Two, was requisitions first for evacuees and then for the Americans. The girls went to Culford, where they were educated separately from the boys until moving back to Northgate Avenue in 1945, when Anne went as a boarder from her home in Thetford.

Anne, 76, who retired to Ramplin Close, Bury, recalls: “In those days 12 miles was a long way but I became a day girl in 1949 because there was a train every morning.”

‘Day bugs’ was the boarders’ nickname for day girls. Anne left the school in 1959 to train as a teacher and has taught all over the country. “I wrote the book not just for remembrance for old girls like me but for youngsters interested in history,” she said.