Adult day care centre in Bury opening new state-of-the-art facilities

Mark Westley Photography ''The Bungalow in Bury St Edmunds, opening of new sensory room for clients. ''Managers Suzanne Smith and Gayle Simpson with Alice Kent, Izzy Phillips, Nicola Buss and Tess Kearney. ANL-141029-173717009
Mark Westley Photography ''The Bungalow in Bury St Edmunds, opening of new sensory room for clients. ''Managers Suzanne Smith and Gayle Simpson with Alice Kent, Izzy Phillips, Nicola Buss and Tess Kearney. ANL-141029-173717009

An independent day care centre in Bury St Edmunds which helps disabled adults is opening its new state-of-the-art sensory room today, which will greatly enhance the service it provides to the community.

The Bungalow, which provides care and activities for over 16s with additional needs, has kitted out its newest facility with equipment to improve clients’ communication skills.

Managers Gayle Simpson and Suzanne Smith, who opened the centre in Canterbury Green four and a half years ago, said they had always planned to build the new facility, which will be officially opened by television presenter Dave Benson-Phillips.

Gayle said: “Our goal from day one was, when we could afford it, to turn the property’s garage into a sensory room.

“Our clients have varied amounts of physical and mental capacity. The room is designed to stimulate them and help them communicate.

“Once they get that basic level of communication, they can take their skills outside of the sensory room.”

New gadgets include a bubble tube to help clients understand cause and effect, a ‘light ladder’, activated by sound to encourage communication, a UV area with special lights and carpet, and a seat on a ceiling track to help less mobile patients move around.

Gayle said: “It is a space to play and relax, but there is also another purpose to it.

“They’re all interactive toys for stimulation and to help with coordination and decision-making.”

The facility is already attracting outside interest. Gayle and Suzanne have been approached by therapists who wish to rent out the space, which Gayle said could also be used by community groups and schools.

“Opening it to the community is definitely a possibility,” she said.