Activities for the whole flock at Ickworth’s wool fair

Sheep shearing at last years Ickworth wool fair which celebrates the estates long history of sheep rearing
Sheep shearing at last years Ickworth wool fair which celebrates the estates long history of sheep rearing
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A country estate will celebrate its long history of sheep rearing at an action-packed wool fair next month.

The fourth annual wool fair at the National Trust’s Ickworth estate on June 3 and 4 promises to be the busiest yet with activities including sheep dog and shearing demonstrations, crafts and archery.

The estate, in Horringer, has had its own flock of sheep for more than 70 years and the history of the Suffolk Sheep breed has been linked to Ickworth since the early 19th century.

Abbi Lang, visitor experience and marketing officer, said: “We’re really looking forward to this year’s wool fair. Ickworth has a strong tradition of farming and craftsmanship on the estate and we’re glad we can continue this.

“It will be a fun day out for all ages and a chance to showcase local craftspeople.”

In June 1886 Frederick William John Hervey, the third Marquess of Bristol, was elected the first president of the Suffolk Sheep Society, which still exists today.

His wife Geraldine Anson collected the silver fish and fans that are in the house.

He was the uncle of the fourth Marquess, who transformed Ickworth with its Italianate-style.

The third Marquess also won many prizes including for his Suffolk black-faced sheep from 1883 to 1886, some of which Ickworth still has in storage.

Continuing this tradition, third generation farmer at Ickworth, Paul ‘Chap’ Seabrook, will be giving shearing demonstrations throughout the wool fair. Visitors can also see alpacas, courtesy of Woodbine Alpacas.

The wool fair is from 10am to 4pm on both days.

For more information on events at Ickworth, visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ickworth