NOSTALGIA: Pond helps wildlife studies - from 1991

Nostalgia: Opening of Ickworth Primary School pond in 1991 ANL-161005-125153005
Nostalgia: Opening of Ickworth Primary School pond in 1991 ANL-161005-125153005
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This photo, taken in July 1991, shows pupils at Ickworth Park Primary School at an opening ceremony for their newly-dug pond.

This photo, taken in July 1991, shows pupils at Ickworth Park Primary School at an opening ceremony for their newly-dug pond.

It was the idea of Rob Berry, National Trust warden on the Ickworth estate, pictured right cutting the ribbon, who thought the school should have its own area to study pondlife as other ponds on the estate were becoming over-dipped by school groups.

The pond was dug by Tim Fisher, project supervisor for Suffolk Employment Training, and his team of eight trainees and stocked with newts, toad spawn and a variety of pond weeds.

HEADLINES FROM THE PAST

10 YEARS AGO

A new £8 million beer bottling plant was officially opened in Bury St Edmunds after swinging into production on May 1.

Greene King’s new bottling hall produced 25,000 bottles of beer an hour and was the biggest investment for the company since the Greene King Brewhouse was built in 1938.

The new building, in Kempson Way, had been called the Old Speckled Hen Hall and was to bottle Abbot Ale, Greene King IPA, Ruddles, County, the Beer To Dine For and the latest addition to the Greene King line up, Greene King Export Strength IPA.

It meant beer was being bottled within a mile of the brewery instead of being sent all over the country for packing.

25 YEARS AGO

A fire, thought to have caused more than £100,000 of damage, had forced a Bury St Edmunds school to close.

Two classrooms at St Edmunds RC Aided School, in Westgate Street, were completely wrecked and the whole school was damaged by heat and smoke.

The blaze was spotted by a policeman and took four fire crews more than half an hour to bring under control. Firefighters were at the scene for five hours clearing up debris.

The school was to reopen in September with two temporary mobile classrooms.

Its 226 pupils were to continue their classes at St Benedicts Upper School in Beetons Way, Bury.

100 YEARS AGO

Mr H Everett, of Great Barton, received this letter announcing the death at the front of his third son, Private Harry Everett, 9th Battalion Suffolk Regiment.

“Dear Mr Everett, I regret very much to have to tell you that your son, Prvt Harry Everett, was wounded last night whilst marching up to the trenches and died before we could remove him to the dressing station.

He has been in the company I have the honour to command since September, 1914, though he was not able to come out with us owing to ill-health when we first left England, but rejoined the Battalion later on.

I am afraid the only consolation I can give you is that your son came to his country’s aid voluntarily when she needed him...” C Packard, captain.