The future is electric (and diesel) says VW chief

The future is electric (and diesel) says VW chief
The future is electric (and diesel) says VW chief

German manufacturer aims to lead the world in electric cars but sees diesel as indispensable

Volkswagen has said that it will continue to develop conventional-fuel vehicles even as it sets its sights on being the world leader in electric cars.

At the company’s AGM, CEO Matthias Müller said it was committed to the development of more electric vehicles as part of its expansion of “e-mobility”. Volkswagen has already invested three billion euros in alternative drive technology since 2012 and plans to spend nine million more in the next five years.

Müller revealed that between now and the end of next year the VW Group will bring 10 new electrified models to market and by 2025 will add 30 BEVs to its line-up. He said that by 2025 the VW Group intended to be “number one in e-mobility”.

Among the models intended to help the group achieve this aim are a range of VW ID cars and Audi e-tron models.

Matthias Müller said that diesel models remained a key part of the VW Group’s strategy

Despite this and the dieselgate scandal, Müller said that diesel was “indispensible for the foreseeable future” and would still play a key part in the company’s strategy.

He sad: “The internal combustion engine primarily is part of the solution, not part of the problem.

“124 years after it was invented, the diesel engine still has plenty of potential. And we intend to exploit that potential. By 2020, we will have made our internal combustion engines between 10 and 15 percent more efficient, and therefore also cleaner. This will help protect the environment and conserve resources.”

Müller’s comments come as the latest figures from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) revealed a decline in diesel car sales as pure electric sales soared. Year-to-date statistics showed that new diesel car registrations have fallen 6.4 per cent while sales of pure EVs have jumped 41.6 per cent in the same period.

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